Heating & Air Conditioning

AC Repair in Charleston, SC

AC Services Charleston, SC

Your Reliable HVAC Contractor in Charleston, SC

If you're like most residents living in the Lowcountry, your home is your happy place. It's where you come to unwind, rest, and regroup for another day at work. But when your HVAC system fails, your peaceful property can turn into an uncomfortable, even unsafe environment. You need to get it fixed, and you need it fixed quickly.

As the most trusted HVAC company in Charleston, Burke HVAC Services, Inc. has the tools, experience, and technicians to help, whether you need a simple maintenance check or emergency HVAC repair. We truly care about your comfort and will do everything in our power to restore your home to the happy place that you love.

Our Service Areas

 HVAC Services Charleston, SC
 Air Conditioning Repair Services Charleston, SC

Why Choose Burke HVAC Services, Inc?

When we opened Burke HVAC Services, Inc. many years ago, we did so with one goal in mind: To exceed our customer's expectations by ensuring that each of our clients received individualized service.

Since that time, we have grown and expanded into one of Charleston's largest HVAC companies, but we still hold true to that goal. Despite our growth, we are proud to say that we continue to offer a boutique, personalized experience for all of our clients.

When you call our office, you will speak to a trained, knowledgeable customer service professional. When you make an appointment for an estimate, we will come to your residence rather than asking you to come to ours. When you need emergency service, you can rest easy knowing an HVAC tech is their way, no matter what time of day.

 HVAC Repair Services Charleston, SC

Charleston's Most Trusted HVAC Business

At Burke HVAC Services, Inc., our customers keep coming back because we believe in hard work, timely service, and fair pricing. Honesty is the backbone of our business, and that will not be changing anytime soon.

Here are just a few more reasons why the Lowcountry leans on Burke HVAC Services, Inc. for their heating and cooling maintenance and repair:

Professional Staff

Professional Staff

Each of our HVAC experts is an EPA Certified Factory Trained Technician. When one of our HVAC techs comes to your home or business, you can rest assured that you will be working with the best of the best.

support

Friendly Customer Service

We know how important that helpful, personable customer service is for our customers. Unlike some heating & air companies, our customer service professionals are local, efficient, and ready to help with all your needs and questions.

Services

24/7 Services

Heating & cooling units tend to break down in the most inopportune times. It doesn't matter if your HVAC system stops working at 2AM on a Saturday night. Our team is ready to work at the most inconvenient times so you can get back to enjoying your home in comfort.

Licensed & Insured

Licensed & Insured

Burke HVAC Services, Inc. is fully licensed and insured to protect your investment and maintain your peace of mind. If you are not 100% satisfied with our work, we will do everything possible to correct any mistake and make the situation right.

On-Site Estimates and Consultations

On-Site Estimates and Consultations

We won't ever ask you to come to our offices for an estimate or consultation. Instead, we come to your home or business, so you don't have to change your daily routine. We cater to your schedule, not the other way around. Call us today at (843) 568-7336 to learn more about our on-site estimates or to schedule a consultation.

Financing Available

Financing Available

To make life a little easier, we offer flexible financing to all of our customers. If you need to pay your bill one payment at a time, we are here to make your HVAC experience as convenient as possible.

When you and your family need the highest level of indoor comfort in South Carolina, Burke HVAC Services, Inc. is ready to get to work - 24-hours a day, 7-days a week.

Our unbeatable HVAC and air quality services include:

AC Repair in Charleston, SC

Having your AC go out during the hottest days of summer is no fun, but don't sweat it; Burke HVAC Services is here to keep you cool!

We know that your home's AC system needs to be fully operational to keep your family comfortable when summertime rolls around. Our skilled AC repair techs in Charleston are ready to help with any AC issue you are having, whether it be a quick fix or full system replacement.

We provide trustworthy AC maintenance services when you need them the most, so you can focus on more important things like your family or business. With the most comprehensive list of AC services in Charleston, we can get your air conditioning pump up to snuff so you can cool down no matter how hot it gets outside.

A few of our most common AC repair services in Charleston include:

  • Filter replacement
  • Broken fan replacement
  • Duct and airflow optimization
  • Motor replacement
  • Thermostat replacement
  • Fan belt replacement
  • Coil replacement and maintenance

Burke HVAC Services, Inc. also offers preventative maintenance and tune-up options for homeowners that would like year-round confidence in their air conditioning system. It doesn't matter if you have a central heating system for your home or a wall-mounted AC unit for your office - we are just a phone call away from keeping summer heat at bay.

 AC Repair Services Charleston, SC
 Heating And AC Services Charleston, SC

AC Installation in Charleston, SC

When properly maintained, a good air conditioning system can last for many years. However, if no amount of repairs or maintenance will fix your AC system, it's probably time to send your old unit to the scrap yard. Before you call us for a replacement system, let us provide you with a thorough exam to make sure it is needed. If we discover that a replacement AC system is required, our skilled technicians would be happy to travel to your to complete the job.

At Burke HVAC Services, Inc., we understand how important it is for you and your family to stay cool during the hot summer months in South Carolina. That is why we are proud to install the highest-rated cooling systems available. When we come to your home or business to install an AC unit, we will take all the time needed to walk you through the process and answer any questions you have.

Any time we install a new air conditioner for a client, we strive to let them know what may be wrong with their original system. We'll discuss what unit might be best for your home, budget, and cooling needs. Once we have a good understanding for what you need, we will get to work right away to minimize your time without air conditioning.

Our goal is to do the best job possible the first time out, with minimal interference in your life. That way, you can continue enjoying summertime while we work hard to give you a fast, effective AC solution.

Signs You Need AC Replacement in Charleston, SC

Did you know that a broken heat pump or air conditioner can lead to higher utility bills? Updated cooling systems, like the replacement systems installed by Burke HVAC Services, are more reliable and can help lower your utility costs over time.

But how do you know if your air conditioning system is on its last legs? Here are a few telltale signs that your AC unit might need to be replaced:

 Air Conditioning Repair Charleston, SC
Warm Air Blowing from AC Unit

Warm Air Blowing from AC Unit

This is a sign that you might need a complicated repair or a replacement AC unit. Before you call Burke HVAC Services, Inc. for an estimate, you should check your air filter first. If it's too dirty to allow airflow, clean or change the filter and check to see if cool air is flowing now.

Outdated AC Unit

Outdated AC Unit

AC systems typically last between 12 and 15 years. If your AC system has more than 15 years of regular use, it might be time for an AC replacement in Charleston.

Rise in Utility Bill

Rise in Utility Bill

AC units become less efficient over time. Old AC systems use more electricity, which will raise your energy bill. Unfortunately, this situation will only get worse until you replace the system with a newer, more energy-efficient model.

Cost to Repair vs. Replace

Cost to Repair vs. Replace

If you find that it will cost you half or more of a new unit's price to fix your old one, it might be time to consider a replacement AC system. Rather than spending money to fix a dying AC unit, you can purchase a new one that is more energy efficient, which will save you money over the long run.

If you are in need of a replacement cooling system for your home in Charleston, Burke HVAC Services, Inc., is here to help.

Give us a call Today & one of our skilled AC technicians will explain the best AC replacement options for your home and budget.

 Heating & Cooling Charleston, SC

Heating Repair in Charleston, SC

Few things are worse than having your heater go out in the middle of winter. Fixing your heater is of the utmost importance when it's freezing outside, and Burke HVAC Services, Inc. has the tools and technicians to help. With our 24/7 emergency heating repair services, you won't have to worry about being left out in the cold. Our talented HVAC contractors in Charleston are only a call away, whether you need a minor fix or a replacement heater.

Here are just a few common issues that Burke HVAC Services, Inc. heating technicians can help solve for you:

  • Overheating of your system
  • Faulty or broken heat exchangers
  • Damaged blower or motor
  • Dirty burners
  • Busted limit switches
  • Misconfigured blower belts

Before you start looking at replacement heaters, call Burke HVAC Services, Inc. first so that we can inspect your heating unit. Your issues might be resolved with a quick fix. If we discover that you need a replacement unit, our heating experts will offer guidance on choosing the best unit for your unique situation.

Signs You Need Heater Replacement in Charleston, SC

AC Services Charleston, SC

If you notice any of the following signs from your furnace, contact Burke HVAC Services, Inc. for an inspection. Our fully-trained furnace repair technicians will detail what issues your furnace is experiencing and offer solutions tailored to your home and budget.

Pilot Light is Out

If your furnace runs on gas and its pilot light will not come on, it is important to address the issues as soon as possible.

Warming Your Home Takes a Long Time

There are many reasons why your furnace isn't heating your home quickly. From duct cleaning to heating element replacement, our furnace repair technicians in Charleston are here to help.

Broken Thermostat

If your heater isn't warming your home to the temperature you desire, your thermostat might be broken.

No Airflow

Little to no airflow throughout your home is usually a sign that your ducts or air vents are blocked. Move any furniture away from air vents. If that does not solve your problem, you should seek help from a professional heating repair company like Burke HVAC Services, Inc.

Noisy Heater

While all heaters emanate noise, you should be concerned if you can hear loud noises coming from a different room or your basement. Be cognizant of how much noise your furnace is making. If it seems like a lot, it's time for a thorough furnace inspection in Charleston.

Our Promise

"Burke HVAC Services, Inc. is committed to providing our customers with the highest quality HVAC services in Charleston. Our goal is to exceed your expectations consistently, from the moment you speak to our representatives to the time our HVAC contractor in Charleston leaves your home. "Remember that any company can make an honest mistake, but it is what they do about it that makes a difference. We will work to make things right by you; that is our promise."

Larry H. Burke Jr. President

 HVAC Services Charleston, SC

Latest News in Charleston, SC

‘Flying blind’: Some COVID-19 monitoring not done in Charleston, other parts of SC

One way the state monitors community transmission of COVID-19 has not been done in Charleston and some other areas of South Carolina for more than two months.At least one scientist who tracks COVID-19 locally said they are ’flying blind” without widespread testing and wastewater surveillance to look for the virus and provide a key indicator of how much is circulating. The Charleston area may actually be in the midst of another surge based on modeling of what data is available, said Dr. Michael Sweat of Medical University o...

One way the state monitors community transmission of COVID-19 has not been done in Charleston and some other areas of South Carolina for more than two months.

At least one scientist who tracks COVID-19 locally said they are ’flying blind” without widespread testing and wastewater surveillance to look for the virus and provide a key indicator of how much is circulating. The Charleston area may actually be in the midst of another surge based on modeling of what data is available, said Dr. Michael Sweat of Medical University of South Carolina. A Clemson University scientist is urging caution as well.

The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control said it is working to take over wastewater surveillance testing for the virus from a lab at the University of South Carolina, which has been reporting those results to the National Wastewater Surveillance System at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“It has been some time, I think, since USC submitted samples to the CDC for reporting out,” Dr. Linda Bell, the state epidemiologist, acknowledged.

A spokesman for USC did not return calls seeking comment.

Wastewater surveillance can pick up trends in virus levels shed in human waste from people who may not have symptoms yet four to six days before it is likely to be picked up by clinical testing, so it can provide an early warning of outbreaks, according to the CDC. It is meant as a complement to other surveillance, but CDC Director Rochelle Walensky praised the testing this year for providing an early signal of outbreaks beginning in the Northeast.

Wastewater treatment plants regularly pull samples for other testing, so it is a matter of taking part of that sample and shipping it off for testing. The labs carefully handle and filter the samples to get something that can be subjected to the same diagnostic testing as patients, said Dr. Delphine Dean, director of the Clemson Research and Education in Disease Diagnosis and Intervention (REDDI) Lab. Bell said it is a recent addition to surveillance but it has value.

“The concept, that wastewater surveillance can be a big benefit to early detection of transmission in a community that does not rely on somebody having to to go a healthcare facility to be tested, it does have really significant attributes in that way,” she said.

According to the CDC’s data, Charleston has not had its wastewater checked for COVID-19 since at least April 7. The same goes for Darlington and Lexington counties, while Richland, Horry, Georgetown and some other areas of the state have not been monitored since around mid-May.

In almost every case, the virus levels were rising when last checked. The only current data is coming from monitoring done at Clemson for Anderson, Greenville, Greenwood and Pickens counties. There, “it is kind of steadily increasing week to week,” Dean said. It is not the explosion of cases seen in some previous surges, with the delta and early omicron variants, but it is rising, she said.

That may also be true for the Charleston area, said Sweat, director of the MUSC COVID-19 Epidemiology Intelligence Project. In its monitoring of Charleston, Berkeley and Dorchester counties, cases per day per 100,000 population increased 10 percent this past week, from 31 to 34, Sweat said.

Recent modeling by Johns Hopkins University and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation suggest that only about 10 percent of actual COVID-19 cases are being picked up by testing due in part to a large amount of home tests. Even using a conservative sixfold multiplier would put the actual cases in the community at 204 per 100,000, or about where cases were during the onslaught of the delta variant last fall, Sweat said.

“We’re in a surge, it’s pretty obvious,” he said. “I think there is a lot of transmission, and it is continuing to go up. Because of vaccination and prior infection, we’re not seeing the same numbers hospitalized and dying” due to better protection against severe disease. That is validated by internal numbers: MUSC closely tracks its own staff who come down with COVID-19 and those numbers are approaching what they were during the delta surge, Sweat said.

Wastewater surveillance would provide a better window into how much virus is actually circulating in the community, he said.

“Having wastewater would be really valuable; there is consensus in the field about that,” Sweat said. When the state stopped widespread testing in favor of home tests, “the value of the case reporting diminished because we were getting vast undercounts. That kind of left us in that flying-blind mode,” he said. Wastewater surveillance for the virus was supposed to help alleviate that, but the area is without it, Sweat said.

“We need it,” he said. “I think it would be valuable to see that.”

It is one reason DHEC is trying to do the testing itself. After meetings over the past week, the DHEC Public Health Laboratory is now working to validate its testing as it prepares to take over the wastewater surveillance, the agency said in a statement to the Post and Courier. That process may continue all summer, DHEC Media Relations Director Ron Aiken said.

But even without it, the state is reporting many other good metrics, such as cases per 100,000 population and hospitalizations, that allow people to know what is happening with COVID-19 in their communities, Bell said.

“We do encourage people to continue to look at the traditional surveillance systems,” Bell said.

U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, in a White House COVID-19 briefing on June 9, also encouraged people to maintain vigilance. “We are not done with the pandemic,” he said. “The virus is still here.”

Clemson was monitoring virus levels in its wastewater on campus and also closely tracking how many people tested positive on campus so it could validate how valuable the wastewater data was in predicting infections, Dean said.

“It allowed us to build pretty good estimates on how the wastewater relates to total case counts,” she said. Its data allows Dean to estimate that 1-1.5 percent of the population is infected in the areas they monitor. It translates into an elevated level of risk, Dean said.

“That means if you are going to be in an indoor setting with a larger group of people, you’re pretty likely to have someone in there who has COVID, so you should take precautions,” she said.

Editorial: Affordable housing win in Charleston shows value of SC housing credit

Creating affordable housing is challenging enough; doing it as part of a sensitive rehabilitation to a historic building in Charleston is even more difficult. That’s why we’re doubly gratified to see construction work finally begin on the long-planned and longer-hoped-for project to convert the former Henry P. Archer School into 89 apartments for seniors with incomes below 60% of the area’s median income.The Nassau Street landmark has been vacant for years and was in such poor condition that it once was considered fo...

Creating affordable housing is challenging enough; doing it as part of a sensitive rehabilitation to a historic building in Charleston is even more difficult. That’s why we’re doubly gratified to see construction work finally begin on the long-planned and longer-hoped-for project to convert the former Henry P. Archer School into 89 apartments for seniors with incomes below 60% of the area’s median income.

The Nassau Street landmark has been vacant for years and was in such poor condition that it once was considered for demolition, despite its history as a place where civil rights leader Septima Clark once taught. The project not only will save an important part of the East Side’s history but also will give the city much-needed housing. The phrase “win-win” is overused but fits here.

Still, anyone following the Charleston region’s housing situation knows full well that this $42 million project, as significant as it is, will put only a small dent in our overall need for more affordable units. That’s why we remain concerned about the future of South Carolina’s affordable housing tax credit — a relatively new financing tool that was a critical part of the mix that’s making the Archer rehabilitation possible.

The 3-year-old credit also has provided help to many other multi-family projects across the state, and its unexpected popularity caused some state officials to grow concerned about the resulting loss of revenue. When the bill to create the credit passed, it was estimated that the state would lose about $16 million a year by the 10th year of the program, but the state actually lost about $50 million last year.

In response, state officials essentially froze the program until the Legislature responded; it did so by capping the credit at $20 million a year, not as high as some housing advocates had hoped for but still high enough to make it a viable tool in the years to come.

The legislation contained other tweaks, including a stipulation that about 20% of the $20 million go toward projects in rural areas and giving the state’s Joint Bond Review Committee more oversight into how the credit is used.

We urge members of that committee and the State Fiscal Accountability Authority — which will come up with an annual plan — to remain supportive of the credit, and we encourage the bond committee and the S.C. Housing Finance and Development Authority to keep tabs on the tax credits to ensure they’re supporting projects that promise to make the biggest differences across the state. We also urge legislators to remain open to the idea of raising the cap in future years as market conditions evolve and we learn more about how state tax credits can help.

We understand why lawmakers felt a need to impose the cap this year, but we believe the potential cost of the tax credits is more than justified by the longstanding affordability problem that reaches far beyond the Lowcountry. A 2019 study found that a third of S.C. families struggle to pay their rent or make their mortgage payments. The National Low Income Housing Coalition shows that we have only 44 available affordable housing units for every 100 families who need them and would qualify for them; it estimates the state has a shortage of more than 85,000 units for extremely low-income renters, who are defined as those making 30% or less of the area median income. Low-income renters make 60% or less of the median income, so the need is far greater than 85,000 units.

The housing authority’s own needs assessment found that more than 140,000 renter households experience “severe cost burden,” meaning they spend at least half of their income on rent and utilities.

As we’ve noted before, lawmakers also should consider how the affordable housing enabled by this credit is helping the state’s economy and residents’ quality of life. Trying to cut costs by limiting these credits too much could prove to be penny-wise and pound-foolish in the end.

The renovated Archer School is expected to open its doors to new residents in two years, but the bigger lesson is that we need many more such projects in the years to come.

PREVIEW: Piccolo Spoleto finale brings together S.C. acts from three genres

As two weeks of the Piccolo Spoleto Festival come to an end, three South Carolina musical acts will close out the festival with one last tradition: the Piccolo Spoleto Finale.Manny Houston, Sam Burchfield and Southbound 17 will gather in Hampton Park on June 11 to end the Piccolo Spoleto Festival. Houston will headline the mainstage, with Burchfield opening the show, and Southbound 17 bringing what it calls its “Ame...

As two weeks of the Piccolo Spoleto Festival come to an end, three South Carolina musical acts will close out the festival with one last tradition: the Piccolo Spoleto Finale.

Manny Houston, Sam Burchfield and Southbound 17 will gather in Hampton Park on June 11 to end the Piccolo Spoleto Festival. Houston will headline the mainstage, with Burchfield opening the show, and Southbound 17 bringing what it calls its “Ameri-kinda” sound to the Rose Pavilion.

Inspired by Childish Gambino and Kanye West, Manny Houston is a hip-hop artist and College of Charleston graduate from the Greenville area currently based in Los Angeles, where he has been working on his music under the mentorship of the producer duo Stargate.

Before pursuing hip-hop full time, Houston (who has a degree in classical piano from the College of Charleston) was a musician in Off-Broadway musicals, most recently Forbidden Broadway: The Next Generation.

Piccolo Spoleto will spotlight his musical training and range in “The Get Down,” which is a set that includes hits from Prince, Rick James and James Brown.

Reconnecting with nature and living like an outlaw: These are the concepts behind Sam Burchfield’s records. He said he loves being a songwriter and is hoping to bring that love to the Piccolo Spoleto Finale stage.

Burchfield’s record Graveyard Flower came out in 2020 at the start of the pandemic. He said the awful timing ended up being good in a way because the album is about reconnection and addresses lots of problems the world was and is facing, like a disconnect from nature.

He has already released several singles from his upcoming album, Scoundrel, which he said plays with the idea of his alter ego, an outlaw living in the Wild West. He used that lens as the base for his storytelling on the album.

Burchfield said his Piccolo show will “play with the duality of those two records and give it the live twist.”

Southbound 17 describes its sound as East Coast Western. Katie Bailey, the lead singer and mandolin player, described the band as country, bluegrass-adjacent, “Ameri-kinda” music. In other words, it loves to put its own spin on songs like “Gypsy” by Fleetwood Mac or “Clocks” by Coldplay by replacing the original instruments with banjo and mandolin.

Bailey, Jack Austen and Jacob Simmons started making music together in 2014 and have played all over the region ever since, with Charleston, Columbia and Myrtle Beach being their main stops. Piccolo Spoleto was a natural fit for them. Bailey said Spoleto has always been a part of their lives, and bringing their music to Piccolo Spoleto is an exciting opportunity.

“We’ll probably [play]a lot of originals, our favorite originals that we do, and sprinkle in some covers that inspire us along the way,” Austen said about the upcoming set. “It’s pretty much going to be a sampling of some of our favorite stuff that we do in our longer shows.”

Burchfield and Bailey both said they are excited to be part of an event as big as this festival because it’s been two years since they’ve been able to really gather with fans and play music without a lot of restrictions.

“To be able to do something like this – that’s something to celebrate,” Bailey said.

Riley Utley a graduate student in the Goldring Arts Journalism and Communications Program at Syracuse University.

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South Carolina spending hundreds of millions of dollars help schools with aging infrastructure

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - As the Saluda County School District educates future generation of Tigers, schools like Saluda Elementary are hampered by aging infrastructure of the past.For starters, there’s the tight cafeteria that can barely squeeze in five classes at lunchtime, the wires held up by zip ties in the hallways, and the boiler rooms that flood with a good rain.The oldest part of the building went up in 1950, and staff say it is well past its prime.“The infrastructure is to the point now that it&rsqu...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - As the Saluda County School District educates future generation of Tigers, schools like Saluda Elementary are hampered by aging infrastructure of the past.

For starters, there’s the tight cafeteria that can barely squeeze in five classes at lunchtime, the wires held up by zip ties in the hallways, and the boiler rooms that flood with a good rain.

The oldest part of the building went up in 1950, and staff say it is well past its prime.

“The infrastructure is to the point now that it’s almost impossible to upgrade our facilities to be cost-effective right now,” Saluda Superintendent Dr. Harvey Livingston said.

But in Saluda County, the tax base isn’t there to afford major renovations and construction, a problem that plagues school districts in South Carolina’s poorer, rural areas.

“A millage tax in some of our poorest counties only brings in $20,000, and in our richest counties, it brings in $2 million,” South Carolina Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman said. “So you can tell how difficult it is to build a school.”

Now the state Department of Education is spending hundreds of millions of dollars to help these schools out.

The department worked with the state’s Revenue and Fiscal Affairs Office to rank every school district based on need, using their per capita incomes, index of tax-paying ability of the school district, and index of tax-paying ability of the county.

It found those with the most need, in order, were Allendale, Bamberg 2, Dillon 3 (Latta), Bamberg 1, Lee, Barnwell 19 (Blackville-Hilda), Barnwell 29 (Williston-Elko), Saluda, Dillon 4, and Hampton. Beginning July 1, the two Bamberg districts will be consolidated, as will the two Barnwell districts.

Spearman’s staff looked at those 10 districts first, then expanded it to the 25 neediest, and consulted vendors to assess school facilities to determine how the state will distribute money.

“We will go right up the list in those and looking at our top-priority need. Now this is not taking care of everything in those districts, but we are trying to help on their No. 1 priority need in facilities,” Spearman said, adding the cost to make infrastructure fixes in every South Carolina school is “well over $1 billion, probably closer to $2 billion.”

So far, more than $15 million is heading to Dillon 3 and 4, and on Thursday, the department announced $38 million will go to Saluda schools.

“$38 million is going to go a tremendous way to improve our facilities in Saluda County Schools. We’re a poor, rural district, do not have a very strong tax base, so every dime we can get from the state is going to be huge for us,” Livingston said following the announcement at Saluda Elementary, where he was joined Spearman, district staff, school board members, and members of the Saluda County delegation in the General Assembly.

The Department of Education has received $100 million from the General Assembly in the current state budget for these projects, and it is allocating $40 million of its remaining pandemic relief money from the federal government toward them as well.

While lawmakers are still finalizing the next budget, Spearman said they anticipate receiving at least another $100 million next year, an appropriation that could be as much as $150 million.

“It has been 70 years since we’ve done anything of this significance,” Spearman said.

In Saluda County, their plan includes tearing down the elementary school and combining it with the nearby primary school into a new K-5 school with a new building. With their $38 million, leaders also have their sights set on building a new wing at Hollywood Elementary School and constructing a career and technology wing at Saluda Middle School and Saluda High School.

To receive this money from the state, districts have to get on board with potential consolidations the Department of Education calls for and put some of their own money in as well. Those dollars could come from a bond referendum on the ballot, money districts have obtained in federal pandemic relief, or elsewhere.

Districts also must select a building design from among the prototype plans narrowed down by the Department of Education, which Spearman said will keep them from having to spend additional money on architectural plans.

Livingston said it’ll be worth it for the county’s students and its taxpayers.

“Our students deserve the same opportunities and same buildings that students across the state have, and this $38 million will just make a world of difference for our students for generations to come,” he said.

Spearman, who is not running for re-election this year as state superintendent, believes these appropriations from the General Assembly should be recurring and has proposed the state establish an “infrastructure bank” from which districts could borrow money for school infrastructure projects.

“Some could pay it back; some may not be able to pay it back,” she said. “But it would be a revolving fund that’s not just for the poorest districts in the state because the fast-growing districts have a tremendous burden too.”

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Golf vacation company expansion in Charleston County to add jobs

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - A company that specializes in organizing golf trips throughout the U.S. and around the nation announced it is expanding operations in Charleston County.Golfbreaks by PGA Tour, founded in 1998 in the United Kingdom, will add 32 new jobs in Mount Pleasant over the next two years.“South Carolina’s golf industry has seen significant growth in recent years, and today’s announcement by Golfbreaks shows that this momentum is not slowing down,” Gov. Henry McMaster said. “I con...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - A company that specializes in organizing golf trips throughout the U.S. and around the nation announced it is expanding operations in Charleston County.

Golfbreaks by PGA Tour, founded in 1998 in the United Kingdom, will add 32 new jobs in Mount Pleasant over the next two years.

“South Carolina’s golf industry has seen significant growth in recent years, and today’s announcement by Golfbreaks shows that this momentum is not slowing down,” Gov. Henry McMaster said. “I congratulate Golfbreaks on their expansion and look forward to their continued growth in South Carolina.”

As the “official golf vacation partner of the PGA Tour, the company offers golfers services including the arranging of tee times, accommodations, ground transportation, tournament tickets.

“With minimal travel restrictions now in place and a lot of pent-up demand, Golfbreaks is growing rapidly. If you like golf and enjoy delivering unforgettable memories to fellow travelers, then a career at Golfbreaks may be perfect for you. Our enthusiastic and vibrant team in Mount Pleasant is on a very exciting journey with our partners at the PGA TOUR.” Golfbreaks CEO Daniel Grave said.

Those interested in joining the Golfbreaks team should visit the company’s careers page.

The company’s Charleston operation is located at 474 Wando Park Blvd. in Mount Pleasant and serves as its North American office.

“We are thrilled with Golfbreaks’ decision to invest further in our community and create 32 new jobs for our citizens,” Charleston County Council Chairman Teddie Pryor said. “Charleston County is a natural fit as we have a passion for golf and more importantly, we have a desire to foster business growth.”

The company was recruited to Charleston County through South Carolina’s Landing Pad program. The company’s expansion plans will allow it to increase its service volume to U.S. and Canadian golfers who take golf trips domestically and overseas.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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About Burke Services, Inc

110 W Ashley Ave P.O. Box 879 Folly Beach, SC 29439

T: (843) 568-7336
E: info@burkeservicesinc.com