Heating & Air Conditioning

AC Repair in Rock Hill, SC

AC Services Rock Hill, SC

Your Reliable HVAC Contractor in Rock Hill, SC

If you're like most residents living in the Lowcountry, your home is your happy place. It's where you come to unwind, rest, and regroup for another day at work. But when your HVAC system fails, your peaceful property can turn into an uncomfortable, even unsafe environment. You need to get it fixed, and you need it fixed quickly.

As the most trusted HVAC company in Rock Hill, Burke HVAC Services, Inc. has the tools, experience, and technicians to help, whether you need a simple maintenance check or emergency HVAC repair. We truly care about your comfort and will do everything in our power to restore your home to the happy place that you love.

Our Service Areas

 HVAC Services Rock Hill, SC
 Air Conditioning Repair Services Rock Hill, SC

Why Choose Burke HVAC Services, Inc?

When we opened Burke HVAC Services, Inc. many years ago, we did so with one goal in mind: To exceed our customer's expectations by ensuring that each of our clients received individualized service.

Since that time, we have grown and expanded into one of Rock Hill's largest HVAC companies, but we still hold true to that goal. Despite our growth, we are proud to say that we continue to offer a boutique, personalized experience for all of our clients.

When you call our office, you will speak to a trained, knowledgeable customer service professional. When you make an appointment for an estimate, we will come to your residence rather than asking you to come to ours. When you need emergency service, you can rest easy knowing an HVAC tech is their way, no matter what time of day.

 HVAC Repair Services Rock Hill, SC

Rock Hill's Most Trusted HVAC Business

At Burke HVAC Services, Inc., our customers keep coming back because we believe in hard work, timely service, and fair pricing. Honesty is the backbone of our business, and that will not be changing anytime soon.

Here are just a few more reasons why the Lowcountry leans on Burke HVAC Services, Inc. for their heating and cooling maintenance and repair:

Professional Staff

Professional Staff

Each of our HVAC experts is an EPA Certified Factory Trained Technician. When one of our HVAC techs comes to your home or business, you can rest assured that you will be working with the best of the best.

support

Friendly Customer Service

We know how important that helpful, personable customer service is for our customers. Unlike some heating & air companies, our customer service professionals are local, efficient, and ready to help with all your needs and questions.

Services

24/7 Services

Heating & cooling units tend to break down in the most inopportune times. It doesn't matter if your HVAC system stops working at 2AM on a Saturday night. Our team is ready to work at the most inconvenient times so you can get back to enjoying your home in comfort.

Licensed & Insured

Licensed & Insured

Burke HVAC Services, Inc. is fully licensed and insured to protect your investment and maintain your peace of mind. If you are not 100% satisfied with our work, we will do everything possible to correct any mistake and make the situation right.

On-Site Estimates and Consultations

On-Site Estimates and Consultations

We won't ever ask you to come to our offices for an estimate or consultation. Instead, we come to your home or business, so you don't have to change your daily routine. We cater to your schedule, not the other way around. Call us today at (843) 568-7336 to learn more about our on-site estimates or to schedule a consultation.

Financing Available

Financing Available

To make life a little easier, we offer flexible financing to all of our customers. If you need to pay your bill one payment at a time, we are here to make your HVAC experience as convenient as possible.

When you and your family need the highest level of indoor comfort in South Carolina, Burke HVAC Services, Inc. is ready to get to work - 24-hours a day, 7-days a week.

Our unbeatable HVAC and air quality services include:

AC Repair in Rock Hill, SC

Having your AC go out during the hottest days of summer is no fun, but don't sweat it; Burke HVAC Services is here to keep you cool!

We know that your home's AC system needs to be fully operational to keep your family comfortable when summertime rolls around. Our skilled AC repair techs in Rock Hill are ready to help with any AC issue you are having, whether it be a quick fix or full system replacement.

We provide trustworthy AC maintenance services when you need them the most, so you can focus on more important things like your family or business. With the most comprehensive list of AC services in Rock Hill, we can get your air conditioning pump up to snuff so you can cool down no matter how hot it gets outside.

A few of our most common AC repair services in Rock Hill include:

  • Filter replacement
  • Broken fan replacement
  • Duct and airflow optimization
  • Motor replacement
  • Thermostat replacement
  • Fan belt replacement
  • Coil replacement and maintenance

Burke HVAC Services, Inc. also offers preventative maintenance and tune-up options for homeowners that would like year-round confidence in their air conditioning system. It doesn't matter if you have a central heating system for your home or a wall-mounted AC unit for your office - we are just a phone call away from keeping summer heat at bay.

 AC Repair Services Rock Hill, SC
 Heating And AC Services Rock Hill, SC

AC Installation in Rock Hill, SC

When properly maintained, a good air conditioning system can last for many years. However, if no amount of repairs or maintenance will fix your AC system, it's probably time to send your old unit to the scrap yard. Before you call us for a replacement system, let us provide you with a thorough exam to make sure it is needed. If we discover that a replacement AC system is required, our skilled technicians would be happy to travel to your to complete the job.

At Burke HVAC Services, Inc., we understand how important it is for you and your family to stay cool during the hot summer months in South Carolina. That is why we are proud to install the highest-rated cooling systems available. When we come to your home or business to install an AC unit, we will take all the time needed to walk you through the process and answer any questions you have.

Any time we install a new air conditioner for a client, we strive to let them know what may be wrong with their original system. We'll discuss what unit might be best for your home, budget, and cooling needs. Once we have a good understanding for what you need, we will get to work right away to minimize your time without air conditioning.

Our goal is to do the best job possible the first time out, with minimal interference in your life. That way, you can continue enjoying summertime while we work hard to give you a fast, effective AC solution.

Signs You Need AC Replacement in Rock Hill, SC

Did you know that a broken heat pump or air conditioner can lead to higher utility bills? Updated cooling systems, like the replacement systems installed by Burke HVAC Services, are more reliable and can help lower your utility costs over time.

But how do you know if your air conditioning system is on its last legs? Here are a few telltale signs that your AC unit might need to be replaced:

 Air Conditioning Repair Rock Hill, SC
Warm Air Blowing from AC Unit

Warm Air Blowing from AC Unit

This is a sign that you might need a complicated repair or a replacement AC unit. Before you call Burke HVAC Services, Inc. for an estimate, you should check your air filter first. If it's too dirty to allow airflow, clean or change the filter and check to see if cool air is flowing now.

Outdated AC Unit

Outdated AC Unit

AC systems typically last between 12 and 15 years. If your AC system has more than 15 years of regular use, it might be time for an AC replacement in Rock Hill.

Rise in Utility Bill

Rise in Utility Bill

AC units become less efficient over time. Old AC systems use more electricity, which will raise your energy bill. Unfortunately, this situation will only get worse until you replace the system with a newer, more energy-efficient model.

Cost to Repair vs. Replace

Cost to Repair vs. Replace

If you find that it will cost you half or more of a new unit's price to fix your old one, it might be time to consider a replacement AC system. Rather than spending money to fix a dying AC unit, you can purchase a new one that is more energy efficient, which will save you money over the long run.

If you are in need of a replacement cooling system for your home in Rock Hill, Burke HVAC Services, Inc., is here to help.

Give us a call Today & one of our skilled AC technicians will explain the best AC replacement options for your home and budget.

 Heating & Cooling Rock Hill, SC

Heating Repair in Rock Hill, SC

Few things are worse than having your heater go out in the middle of winter. Fixing your heater is of the utmost importance when it's freezing outside, and Burke HVAC Services, Inc. has the tools and technicians to help. With our 24/7 emergency heating repair services, you won't have to worry about being left out in the cold. Our talented HVAC contractors in Rock Hill are only a call away, whether you need a minor fix or a replacement heater.

Here are just a few common issues that Burke HVAC Services, Inc. heating technicians can help solve for you:

  • Overheating of your system
  • Faulty or broken heat exchangers
  • Damaged blower or motor
  • Dirty burners
  • Busted limit switches
  • Misconfigured blower belts

Before you start looking at replacement heaters, call Burke HVAC Services, Inc. first so that we can inspect your heating unit. Your issues might be resolved with a quick fix. If we discover that you need a replacement unit, our heating experts will offer guidance on choosing the best unit for your unique situation.

Signs You Need Heater Replacement in Rock Hill, SC

AC Services Rock Hill, SC

If you notice any of the following signs from your furnace, contact Burke HVAC Services, Inc. for an inspection. Our fully-trained furnace repair technicians will detail what issues your furnace is experiencing and offer solutions tailored to your home and budget.

Pilot Light is Out

If your furnace runs on gas and its pilot light will not come on, it is important to address the issues as soon as possible.

Warming Your Home Takes a Long Time

There are many reasons why your furnace isn't heating your home quickly. From duct cleaning to heating element replacement, our furnace repair technicians in Rock Hill are here to help.

Broken Thermostat

If your heater isn't warming your home to the temperature you desire, your thermostat might be broken.

No Airflow

Little to no airflow throughout your home is usually a sign that your ducts or air vents are blocked. Move any furniture away from air vents. If that does not solve your problem, you should seek help from a professional heating repair company like Burke HVAC Services, Inc.

Noisy Heater

While all heaters emanate noise, you should be concerned if you can hear loud noises coming from a different room or your basement. Be cognizant of how much noise your furnace is making. If it seems like a lot, it's time for a thorough furnace inspection in Rock Hill.

Our Promise

"Burke HVAC Services, Inc. is committed to providing our customers with the highest quality HVAC services in Rock Hill. Our goal is to exceed your expectations consistently, from the moment you speak to our representatives to the time our HVAC contractor in Rock Hill leaves your home. "Remember that any company can make an honest mistake, but it is what they do about it that makes a difference. We will work to make things right by you; that is our promise."

Larry H. Burke Jr. President

 HVAC Services Rock Hill, SC

Latest News in Rock Hill, SC

David Tepper’s company says it sent notice to terminate Panthers project in Rock Hill

David Tepper’s company says it sent notice to terminate Panthers project in Rock HillBy WSOCTV.com News StaffROCK HILL, S.C. — David Tepper’s LLC has released a statement after pausing construction on the team’s practice facility in Rock Hill, saying it has sent notices to the city of Rock Hill to formally terminate its previous agreements.Channel 9 has previously reported the Carolina Panthers owner’s LLC, GT Real Estate Holdings, has invested more than $170 million into the development. Th...

David Tepper’s company says it sent notice to terminate Panthers project in Rock Hill

By WSOCTV.com News Staff

ROCK HILL, S.C. — David Tepper’s LLC has released a statement after pausing construction on the team’s practice facility in Rock Hill, saying it has sent notices to the city of Rock Hill to formally terminate its previous agreements.

Channel 9 has previously reported the Carolina Panthers owner’s LLC, GT Real Estate Holdings, has invested more than $170 million into the development. The contract for the project was between the city of Rock Hill and GT Real Estate Holdings.

Tepper Sports and Entertainment paused construction in early March, saying the city of Rock Hill failed to get the finances to pay for public infrastructure.

On April 1, the city of Rock Hill and York County Council said they supported starting construction again on the $225 million development, according to a new resolution.

“The city remains supportive of the project and especially recognizes that restarting construction and development of the project will benefit residents of the city, county and the entire state of South Carolina,” the resolution reads.

A GTRE spokesperson shared the following statement with Channel 9 on Tuesday:

“On February 26, 2021, the City of Rock Hill became delinquent on their obligation to fund the public infrastructure. Despite our persistent efforts throughout 2021, the City of Rock Hill failed to issue the bonds or provide the funding for the public infrastructure for the project.

“On March 18, 2022, GTRE issued a default notice and the City did not cure its default within the prescribed 30-day cure period. It is unfortunate that some recently decided to conduct a misguided, destructive public relations campaign to obscure their failures.

“We have sent notices to the City to formally terminate the previous agreements. Accordingly, we are prepared to sit down with the City and other interested parties to discuss the significant challenges ahead.”

[ ALSO READ: As Panthers’ new HQ remains on hold, Rock Hill leaders say they’ve done their best ]

Channel first heard from Tepper Sports & Entertainment on March 7, when it first confirmed it had paused construction on the project because the city of Rock Hill failed to provide the money. However, Rock Hill leaders said they were prepared to issue bonds, but that the Panthers told them not to.

South Governor Henry McMaster said he was disappointed to hear the news and he released the following statement to Channel 9:

“Today’s announcement by the Panthers is a disappointment, as we had hoped they would be a part of South Carolina’s record breaking, booming economy.

“In 2021, we broke a decade’s worth of records for job recruitment, investment, and expansion, announcing 18,000 new jobs and $5.6 billion in capital investment. And our state government’s finances are in the strongest condition ever, with the largest budget surpluses, the largest rainy-day reserves, and the lowest debt in our history.

“South Carolina is winning, and we intend to keep winning. The best is yet to come!”

Statement from Rock Hill:

“The City of Rock Hill joined state and county leaders and the greater community in welcoming the Panthers to Rock Hill and shared in the excitement over Mr. Tepper’s idea of “two states, one team.” Over the past three years, City staff and local elected officials have invested countless hours negotiating agreements and working to perform the City’s part of the agreements to make this a successful development for both the Panthers and the Rock Hill community.

We are disappointed with the current dispute and with the decision of the Panthers to halt the Rock Hill development, thus undermining the exhaustive efforts of the City of Rock Hill, State of South Carolina, York County, Rock Hill Schools, key landowners, and the entire region. It was and remains our intention to continue negotiating in good faith while protecting the interests of our taxpayers. In fact, in the past few weeks we have attempted to meet with the Panthers on numerous occasions to no avail.

The City met all obligations required under the agreements. The City did not commit to provide unlimited City backstop, but instead agreed to use its best reasonable efforts to issue bonds to be repaid by the increase in the tax revenues generated from development of the site which protects the City’s taxpayers and the City’s favorable financial position. As set forth in the parties’ finance agreement, the City was not required –

to pledge, use or contribute any City funds, revenues or assets to the repayment of the Bonds beyond the Panthers Fund Proceeds, Reserve Funds derived from proceeds of the Bonds, together with capitalized interest, if any, or [municipal improvement district (MID)] assessments imposed in accordance with the MID Governing Documents; and … the City’s reasonable best efforts to issue Bonds shall not be construed as an assurance or guarantee by the City that there will be a buyer for any of the Bonds.

As Mayor John Gettys has said,

Our community embraced the Panthers and welcomed them to South Carolina. Be assured the City of Rock Hill did everything to make this project a success and has not defaulted on any of our obligations…that is not how we do business.

The City does not believe in addressing, through a public back-and-forth, its differences with another party. We are encouraged the Panthers may now be willing to meet and look forward to resolving any and all outstanding issues so that we can together fulfill the promises implicit in the “two states, one team” ethos. From our standpoint, we are prepared to meet as early as today. Accordingly, this will be the last public statement from the City regarding the most recent misleading and erroneous statements from the Panthers.”

Statement from York County:

“It is disheartening to learn today that the Carolina Panthers have terminated their original agreements with the City of Rock Hill. However, York County remains optimistic that this project can still move forward. The Panthers have expressed a willingness to continue discussions with all parties involved and face the challenges ahead. York County expresses that same willingness.”

“Rock Hill obviously wasn’t able to fulfill its obligations,” York County Councilman William Bump Roddey said.

Roddey told Channel 9 that he hopes York County can come to an agreement with the Panthers.

“This does open the door for York County to sit back down at the table and take total control of the deal. Total control of the financing options,” Roddey said.

However, York County Councilman Brandon Guffey said he isn’t so sure about that idea.

“At this point no absolutely not. But I need to calm down and count to 10,” Guffey said.

(WATCH BELOW: Congressman Ralph Norman on stalled Panthers facility: ‘Taxpayers deserve better’)

Congressman Ralph Norman on stalled Panthers facility: ‘Taxpayers deserve better’

©2022 Cox Media Group

The Panthers-Rock Hill project stalemate: What we now know about the deal

The Panthers halted construction on its headquarters project in Rock Hill more than a month ago. The Charlotte-based NFL team’s owner, David Tepper, has remained silent in what has become a high-profile disagreement, while Rock Hill officials have defended the city’s expertise in successfully executing multi-million dollar projects.Meanwhile, York County has presented an ...

The Panthers halted construction on its headquarters project in Rock Hill more than a month ago. The Charlotte-based NFL team’s owner, David Tepper, has remained silent in what has become a high-profile disagreement, while Rock Hill officials have defended the city’s expertise in successfully executing multi-million dollar projects.

Meanwhile, York County has presented an alternative financial package to salvage the project.

Several state and federal politicians have weighed in. Some are frustrated. Others are hoping a resolution is soon reached.

If you drive along Interstate 77 near the Panthers’ planned site, the only activity you’ll see is work on a new interchange.

It’s not totally clear at what point the deal went wrong, but here’s what The Herald knows:

On March 21, York County Council passed a resolution that would commit the county to enter a fee agreement with the team.

Under the county’s resolution, the Panthers would receive incentives for four decades in exchange for completing $225 million of public infrastructure at the site.

The $225 million in bonds was part of the agreement with Rock Hill.

Rock Hill City Council, on March 28, passed a resolution in support of the county’s alternative agreement.

The city, county and Panthers would need to release one another from the existing incentive deal in order to move forward with a new one.

The city’s resolution gave the county and GT Real Estate Holdings, which represents the Panthers, the go-ahead for all three “to enter into agreements, mutual releases and future approvals as contemplated by the county resolution.” A new plan would be “subject to final approval of city council,” the resolution says.

On April 1, York County said in a statement that it was awaiting word from Tepper and GT Real Estate on the future of the construction, including acceptance, or rejection, of the county’s proposed financial plan.

A spokesperson for the city told The Herald Thursday that Rock Hill has not received any additional information from the Panthers and hasn’t had any further contact with the team.

A spokesperson for York County told The Herald Thursday that the county also has not received an update.

In early March, Tepper Sports, which represents the Panthers, announced a pause in construction on the Rock Hill project due to missed payment deadlines. The first phase of construction was set to be completed in 2023.

“To that end, while GT Real Estate Holdings, LLC has invested more than $170 million into the development in Rock Hill, our partners have been unable to contribute the agreed upon investment to fund the construction of the public infrastructure,” Tepper Sports said in a statement in early March.

In early March, Rock Hill said in a statement that the city has met all obligations required under the agreement and was unaware of a planned pause in construction.

Mayor John Gettys, at a March 14 city council meeting, pushed back on accusations that the city missed payments.

“Any implication by the Panthers that the city did not do its absolute and professional best is simply not true,” he said.

City manager David Vehaun said, at the March 14 meeting, that the Panthers slowed Rock Hill’s ability to issue the $225 million in bonds.

Before Rock Hill could issue the bonds, the city needed specific details from the Panthers, such as development and financial plans, to provide to potential investors, Vehaun said.

“The Panthers were not submitting enough details in the way of development plans and other checklist items that … were going to be necessary to issue the bonds,” Vehaun said.

The city never received sufficient details from the team, a spokesperson told The Herald.

As part of the original agreement, Rock Hill pledged 100% of its tax revenues from the site. The city, in exchange, insisted that it would not “backstop” — or guarantee — the debt.

But the Panthers repeatedly requested that the city do just that, Vehaun said.

“I would tell you from our very first meetings in 2019, we were very clear that the city would not, could not, and should not backstop this debt,” he said.

As a result, Vehaun said the Panthers continued to look at other options to deal with the funding. Other options included the May 2021 attempt by Panthers Chief Operating Mark Hart asking York County for help. In a letter, Hart wrote that the Panthers were concerned that without the county’s assistance, the city would not secure the bonds.

However, by the end of 2021, Vehaun said Rock Hill reached a point with the team that would allow the city to proceed with issuing the bonds.

“We felt that everybody was on the same page, including the Panthers,” he said.

And in early 2022, Vehaun said the city was about two weeks away from issuing the bonds when the Panthers asked the city to stop, and indicated that the team wanted to “try additional things to get the debt issued.”

Vehaun said the team has projected the 240-acre property to be a $500 million investment. And the city’s Riverwalk, a 1,008-acre development, also was a $500-$600 million project, Vehaun said.

“We’re familiar in dealing with these kinds of projects and these sizes of projects, but we need to do it on terms that make sure the city’s financial credit is protected,” he said.

The city agreed to issue more than $10 million in bonds for the Riverwalk development, but Rock Hill required that the developer put the property as security, Vehaun said.

“If the taxes generated from the site were not sufficient to retire the debt, then the developer said, ‘I’ll write a check to cover the difference between the shortfall, and if I fail to do that, I’ll hand over my entire site to the city,’ which we would take and sell to someone … to get enough money to retire the debt and pay the debt off,” Vehaun said.

The city has used that model for several multi-million dollar projects, Vehaun said.

“That model of asking developers to make sure that we’re covered is the same model we did at Fountain Park,” he said. “It’s the same model that we did at University Center. It’s the same model we’re in discussions with other development opportunities.”

As part of the original deal, Rock Hill agreed to put all the tax revenues from the site back into the project for public infrastructure, Vehaun said. He pointed out that the city isn’t missing out on future taxes that Rock Hill “expected to do other things in the community with.”

“That was really the only financial commitment that we’ve made to the Panthers in that respect up until now,” he said. “The city is not financially at risk with anything that happens out there.”

U.S. Rep. Ralph Norman released a statement Sunday urging Tepper to be transparent with taxpayers and local officials. Norman, who’s been a Rock Hill real estate developer for decades, said in the statement he’s not “seen this degree of uncommunicativeness.”

“Each passing day that Tepper Sports declines comment only results in more rumors, more speculation, and more anxiety over catastrophic losses for our community should this venture fall apart,” Norman said.

S.C. Rep. JA Moore, D-Charleston, said in a statement Wednesday that he initially voted against giving millions in state tax incentives to fund the project for fear of a situation like this.

“We need to invest in smart economic development that benefits taxpayers and promoted economic growth, not make billionaires wallet’s bigger,” Moore said.

On Tuesday, S.C. Gov. Henry McMaster told reporters in Greenville, S.C., that he’s spoken to Tepper about the situation.

“He explained it as a pause,” McMaster said. “I look forward to that pause being over with and we can get on going.”

This story was originally published April 15, 2022 9:46 AM.

Two movie theaters, a Walmart site and I-77 property among latest Rock Hill area sales

Two Rock Hill movie theater sites headline the biggest area property sales of late. There’s also a Walmart site, and lots of land off I-77.Almost 30 York, Lancaster and Chester county properties sold for $1 million or more in April. Combined, the sales went for more than $108 million.Here are, according to land records from each county, the biggest property sales in April from the tri-county area:? A nearly 120,000-square-foot storage facility between Fort Mill and Tega Cay sold April 25 for $13 million. The 881 Go...

Two Rock Hill movie theater sites headline the biggest area property sales of late. There’s also a Walmart site, and lots of land off I-77.

Almost 30 York, Lancaster and Chester county properties sold for $1 million or more in April. Combined, the sales went for more than $108 million.

Here are, according to land records from each county, the biggest property sales in April from the tri-county area:

? A nearly 120,000-square-foot storage facility between Fort Mill and Tega Cay sold April 25 for $13 million. The 881 Gold Hill Road property built in 2016 sold from ABI Better Boxes Fort Mill to a company affiliated with Simply Self Storage of Orlando, Florida. The site is west of I-77, near the intersection of Gold Hill and Pleasant roads.

? The Super Walmart site in York sold to Michigan-based Agree Eastern. An almost 152,000-square-foot commercial property built in 1998, on close to 18 acres, sold April 5 for $12.8 million. The property at 970 E. Liberty St. is west of Moss Justice Center, and east of downtown York.

? Almost 5 acres at 600 Greenway Industrial Dr. in Fort Mill sold April 27 for $11 million. The site includes a more than 100,000-square-foot distribution warehouse in the Lakemont area near Carowinds Boulevard and Pleasant Road. YFO Exchange of Fort Mill bought the site for almost twice what prior owner 600 Greenway LLC paid in a 2020 sale. The site has been pieced out since it was part of a larger property that sold in 2014 for more than $53 million.

? A Rock Hill movie theater sold April 22 for $10.8 million. The 1935 Cinema Dr. property on almost 14 acres includes the nearly 60,000-square-foot Manchester Cinemas. California-based Ramar Property bought the site from Lyle Cinemas. The theater was built in 2000.

? A Fort Mill industrial property sold April 5 for $7.4 million. The 419 York Southern Road site includes a 100,000-square-foot distribution warehouse and 1,200 square feet of commercial space. Both buildings were constructed in 1978. An Alabama company bought the almost 7-acre property not far from the North Carolina line, between Lifepointe and MorningStar church properties.

? Three I-77 area properties in Rock Hill sold April 27 for $6.5 million. The properties combine for about 50 acres. A California-based company bought the properties from Javelin Real Estate. The properties run along the east side of the interstate between South Anderson and Firetower roads. The southernmost piece is beside Rock Hill High School. Part of the property has had multiple metal fabrication company owners.

? A total of 21 properties on Grish Street and one on Grant Farm Drive in Fort Mill sold April 26 for $5.7 million. The residential properties are a mix of built and vacant sites. The site is in the northern part of York County, near Tega Cay off S.C. 160 West. Triangle Real Estate of Gastonia bought the properties from Carolina Opportunity Fund.

? A 25,000-square-foot commercial building at 3475 Lakemont Blvd. in Fort Mill sold April 5 for almost $4.4 million. The property is more than 4 acres. A Charlotte company bought the office building there.

? A more than 4,700-square-foot commercial building at 4824 Old York Road sold April 5 for $3.5 million. The oil change business built there last year is in the Newport area of Rock Hill, near the Walmart shopping center. A company based in Matthews, N.C., bought the site.

? More than 21 acres of vacant residential property in Clover sold for almost $3.2 million on April 4. The property is near the southwest corner of the S.C. 55 and 557 intersection, within Ole Cambridge Circle. It’s just west of Clover High School. Mattamy Carolina Corporation bought the site from local developer Development Solutions Group.

? More than two dozen vacant home sites on Hunts Mesa Drive, Moon Hill Place, Haystack Avenue and Sandstone Crest Lane in Lancaster County sold April 13 for almost $3.1 million. Stanley Martin Homes of Charlotte owns the Indian Land properties in the newest development in the Harrisburg and Barberville roads area, up against the North Carolina state line.

? A more than 12,000-square-foot commercial building on almost 3 acres at 499 Lakeshore Pkwy. sold April 14 for $2.9 million. New Jersey-based Vekash Holdings bought the Tech Park office property in Rock Hill.

? The more than 22-acre industrial site at 136 Grace Ave. in Lancaster sold April 1 for $2.5 million. Springs Global US of Fort Mill bought the site from Springs Office Investors LLC. The more than 100,000-square-foot site was built in 1969 and remodeled in 1974.

? A 160,000-square-foot commercial building on 19 acres sold April 4 for $2.5 million in Chester County. Sloan Industries bought the 2218 Dawson Dr. site from Jam Next Generation. The property is north of Chester, between Saluda and Darby roads.

? Almost 10 acres of property at 2240 Rosewood Drive in sold April 12 for $2 million. The Rock Hill School District sold the more than 40,000-square-foot school site, formerly Rosewood Elementary School, to Westminster Catawba Christian School.

? A home on more than 23 acres in Lancaster sold April 5 for almost $1.6 million. The home of the Three Crow Road property is more than 3,700 square feet.

? The former Carmike Cinema 7 and AMC Theatres site in Rock Hill sold for almost $1.5 million. Doggett LLC bought the property from Stewart & Everett Theatres on March 30, but re-recorded the site in property records April 11. The more than 22,000-square-foot theater built in 1982 sits on almost 5 acres at 2150 Cherry Road.

Plans were submitted to the city last year to convert the former theater to residential space.

? More than 10 acres of commercial property on Walnut Creek Parkway in Indian Land sold April 14 for almost $1.4 million. Lakemont Property Investors of Charlotte bought the site from Edenmoor Land Acquisition. The property sits at the southeast corner us U.S 521, or Charlotte Highway, and Walnut Creek Parkway.

? A 3,400-square-foot home on Pine Moss Lane in Lake Wylie sold April 14 for $1.3 million.

? A 5,000-square-foot Wessington Manor Lane home in Fort Mill sold April 8 for $1.3 million.

? A 4,100-square-foot Wood Duck Point home in Lake Wylie sold April 6 for $1.3 million.

? A King Road home on 30 acres in western York County sold April 25 for almost $1.3 million.

? A 3,700-square-foot Thatcher Way home in Fort Mill sold April 28 for almost $1.2 million.

? More than 66 acres of residential property on Bate Harvey Road in Clover sold April 19 for more than $1.1 million. The property is between Glenn Road and Christmas Tree Lane.

? A home on Chimney Bluff Road in Lancaster County sold April 21 for $1.1 million.

? A 3,800-square-foot Harvest Pointe Drive home in Fort Mill sold April 20 for more than $1 million.

? A 3,700-square-foot Wessington Manor Lane home in Fort Mill sold April 28 for more than $1 million.

? An almost 5,000-square-foot Lancaster County home on Loire Valley Drive sold April 18 for more than $1 million.

? Almost 29 acres of agricultural property on Old Church Road in Lancaster County sold April 19 for $1 million. The property is between Old Church and U.S. 521, just north of East Rebound Road in Indian Land.

Here’s the latest on more than 1,000 new homes planned in York and Lancaster counties

More than 1,000 new homes and townhomes are proposed in York and Lancaster counties.Some already have their decisions, while many more await decisions from planning commissions or councils. The York County planning commission will meet May 9. Decisions must be made on a final land sale in Baxter, a large York property with hundreds of proposed homes, and an extension of time for a large Lake Wylie development.Projects include:? Owner Clear Springs Baxter and developer Fielding Homes applied for a new townhome subdivision...

More than 1,000 new homes and townhomes are proposed in York and Lancaster counties.

Some already have their decisions, while many more await decisions from planning commissions or councils. The York County planning commission will meet May 9. Decisions must be made on a final land sale in Baxter, a large York property with hundreds of proposed homes, and an extension of time for a large Lake Wylie development.

Projects include:

? Owner Clear Springs Baxter and developer Fielding Homes applied for a new townhome subdivision at Sixth Baxter Crossing and Hugh Street, near North Sutton Road. The property is almost 3 acres. The plan involves 20 townhomes.

The Borough at Sixth Baxter is, according to county information sent to the planning commission, the last lot in Baxter Village to be sold by Clear Springs Baxter. The property is near both residential and commercial space, including an urgent care site.

? The Bull Creek project in York is back up for county review. County planning staff recommends against the plan for a 409-lot manufactured home community at 975 McAfee Court. County planning staff doesn’t believe that scale of development is consistent with residential and agricultural uses in that area now, according to informtion sent to the planning commission. The 155-acre property has 62 mobile homes on it now.

? Owners of 14 acres on Saluda Street in Rock Hill applied to rezone the property to allow a new 11-home subdivision. There are five manufactured homes there, plus wooded and grassy areas. A sketch plan shows all 11 lots off a single entrance from Saluda, which leads to a cul-de-sac.

The property is east of Ogden Farms and south of Cedarbrook, between Porter Black Road and Autumnwood Drive.

? Almost 200 more homes are still planned, but could come later than was laid out in a prior county approval. Fielding Homes got county approval to build four new phases of Paddlers Cove in Lake Wylie. The 135-acre new portion of the existing subdivision is set for 195 homes.

County approvals typically come with two-year vested rights. Developers have to request annual extensions if they don’t start until after the vested rights period ends. Developers get up to five such extensions. The owner asks the county now for an extension to run through March 2023.

The Lancaster County planning commission met Thursday night. The commission recommended a zoning change for almost 44 acres that would allow a new home subdivision. Lancaster County Council will make the final decision.

The property on the southeast corner of Fork Hill Road and Little Dude Avenue is owned by R&C Investments. Earl Coulston applied for the zoning change. The site is just north of Kershaw, about a mile west of Haile Gold Mine.

Dale Robertson is a partner with R&C Investments. Robertson has done other residential projects in that area, with the mine in mind.

“There’s just a lot of people that are driving an hour and fifteen minutes, some of them two hours, to work,” Robertson told the planning commission Thursday. “There’s hardly no houses down there for people to buy.”

A plan with an exact number of new homes hasn’t been submitted, but the new zoning would allow up to 2.5 homes per acre. Or, roughly 110 homes for a property that size.

An even larger project was on the planning commission agenda Thursday, but was deferred until next month. Rezoning and a development agreement are proposed for Arbor Walk. That new home subdivision could have 233 homes on almost 113 acres on Vance Baker Road.

The planning commission in Rock Hill met Tuesday, where one of several property proposals was the Arbors at Seven Oaks project. Owner Rock Hill Multifamily Investments applied for preliminary plat approval on Springsteen Road and Evelyn Street. There are three parcels, two in front of the Seven Oaks subdivivision and the other with a pond on Evelyn.

Plans show 148 townhomes proposed on 21 acres. The site was approved for 220 apartments in 2014. Plans have changed and been pushed back several times due to utility and other negotiations.

Several road upgrades are part of the plan. Access to the site southwest of Seven Oaks Boulevard will come from a new driveway connection to Springsteen. The area northeast of Seven Oaks Boulevard will have a new drive onto Springsteen and and another onto Evelyn, across from Wildwood Drive. A left turn lane on Springsteen at Evelyn will be added, and the intersection will be realigned. Springsteen also will be widened to create a center turn lane.

Fort Mill’s championship baseball program will redevelop Rock Hill property

A baseball program built on a historic run of success in Fort Mill plans to open a new facility in Rock Hill.Mill Town Industrial Properties submitted plans April 7 to rezone property near District 3 Stadium in Rock Hill for a new baseball training facility. The company is connected to Mill Town Baseball Academy, which formed from the same coaches and many of the same players who won a state championship and then the ...

A baseball program built on a historic run of success in Fort Mill plans to open a new facility in Rock Hill.

Mill Town Industrial Properties submitted plans April 7 to rezone property near District 3 Stadium in Rock Hill for a new baseball training facility. The company is connected to Mill Town Baseball Academy, which formed from the same coaches and many of the same players who won a state championship and then the Dixie Youth Baseball World Series last summer representing Fort Mill.

The Rock Hill plan would transform a former lumberyard just south of the high school football stadium, between Chester Street and Lancaster Avenue.

There are five buildings on the property, which is more than 3 acres. Three buildings would be removed. One would be used for indoor baseball training. The other is shown on a submitted sketch plan as a possible restaurant.

The removed buildings would make way for parking to serve the project. A later phase would be an outdoor baseball field for training.

Chris Mattox is listed as the applicant. Ryan Smith addressed the Rock Hill city planning commission to outline plans. Both were coaches with the Fort Mill squad last summer that since has grown to include travel teams as Mill Town Baseball.

“Chris and I grew up playing baseball around the Fort Mill, Charlotte area,” Smith told the commission earlier this week. “Went on to play college ball, each of us. Both of us have been fairly successful in our careers and our lives, and we attribute a lot of that to being raised on the ballfields. Being taught life skills through baseball.”

The success of last summer’s team, formed of all stars from the town parks and recreation program, continued even beyond the World Series run.

“From there we said, ‘We can’t stop here,’” Smith said.

The main building that will be used for training is 11,000 square feet and has 20-plus-foot ceilings. It would be perfect for baseball training, Smith said, and softball at some point, too. Smith said he’d like Fort Mill, Rock Hill and surrounding areas to become known as a baseball hotbed.

“It just makes perfect sense for us to further that mission,” he said.

The planning commission recommended the rezoning, but the final decision comes from Rock Hill City Council. Rock Hill is a city known for youth sports, from its investment in sites like Cherry Park and Manchester Meadows to its “Football City USA” moniker and familiar “Competition Lives Here” motto.

The training site also would be an infill project to grow downtown development, other common city goals.

“What you guys are doing, working with youth, that’s right up our alley here,” said planning commission chair Randy Graham.

This story was originally published May 5, 2022 11:37 AM.

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